Defining Style

Design styles are a look. A visual expression of a place in time and a snapshot of the lifestyles our clients want to live. Talking about style in design provides an immediate picture of a knowledge base.

When working with a new client, often my first step is determining where their tastes and preferences fall within the framework of defined interior styles. This can start by viewing a collection of photos, pictures in magazines or websites together. I have conversations with my clients to draw out what specifically they love in the pictures they are drawn to, and how they imagine seeing those looks in their home – how will that style live for them.

Since design styles have a clear look, how can someone start telling them apart? There are three main categories used in defining interior design style: traditional, modern and transitional.

Traditional

A traditional look is based on historic elements drawing the colors, patterns and furniture forms from before the 1940s.

Traditional Style

Traditional Style

Modern

Modern design has cleaner lines, simpler detailing, thinner proportions and draws from the time period of 1940-1980.

Modern Style

Modern Style

Modern Style

Modern Style

Transitional

Transitional is a more eclectic style. A contemporary look originating in the 1990s, it blends a mix of modern and contemporary elements with a hint of the traditional. The emphasis is on good scale and cleaner lines, with a feeling warmer than modern; cleaner than traditional.  Transitional style is very current in interior design — it's often what you see in magazines in the US.

Transitional Style

Transitional Style

Transitional Style

Transitional Style

Click through to view my portfolio to see more examples of each style.

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